Hollywood Road is one of the first roads built in Hong Kong to facilitate the transport of military supplies. Legend has it that the road got its name from the numerous Holly trees growing on both sides of the road, thus forming “woods”.Later, as the residing population grew in size, a new city emerged from amidst the woods.

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Ilex is a genus of plants of about 400 species, with mostly evergreen trees. Their height ranges from 2 to 25 metres, with firm and lustrous leaves, and small, red and globular fruits which serve as food for birds. The twigs and leaves of some Ilex species are used as raw materials for making paper, and the bark can be used to make dye, while the wood is suitable for small carpentry.

The British commonly use Ilex (Holly, Ilex aquifolium) for Christmas decorations. The Chinese use three species of Ilex – Ilex rotunda (the species found on Hollywood Road), Ilex latifolia and Ilex asprella — to create “Trilex Tea”, a traditional Chinese herbal tea that has anti-toxic properties.

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Gas lamps
Gas lamps

In 1862, the Hong Kong and China Gas Company Limited was founded and street lamps began to appear. The only four surviving gas street lamps are located on Duddell Street, Central.

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1840s The British army landed on Hong Kong Island, and promptly established a police force, built a prison and a magistracy to enforce British laws.

1941-45 During World War II, the Central Police Station was occupied by the Japanese forces. After WWII, the Central Magistracy beside the Police Station became an extraordinary chamber for holding trials of war criminals.

1969 Queen Elizabeth II granted the Royal Charter to the Hong Kong Police Force, making it the Royal Hong Kong Police Force.

1979 Hong Kong became the port of first asylum for Vietnamese refugees. The Central Magistracy was relocated and the original site was converted for use by the Immigration Department. The Victoria Prison was turned into a centre for transferring and repatriating Vietnamese refugees.

1982 Prisons Department was renamed Correctional Services Department providing rehabilitation services for prison inmates.

1995 The Central Police Station, Victoria Prison Compound and the former Central Magistracy were declared as monuments.

2006 The Central Police Station Compound was decommissioned. The site will be revitalised as a centre of heritage, culture, arts and leisure facilities.

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Declared Monuments at 10 Hollywood Road

Turning into Hollywood Road from Pottinger Street in Central, one can see this cluster of western-styled buildings constructed along the hillside overlooking Victoria Harbour – the Central Police Station Compound.The Compound comprises the Central Police Station, the former Central Magistracy and the Victoria Prison. The buildings are imposing and sturdy, and symbolise the spirit of discipline in the colonial era.In 1841, the British army occupied Hong Kong Island and established a temporary police force. At the very beginning, the police force had only 32 members (including British and Indian soldiers, foreign sailors and Chinese). In 1844, the colonial government formally established the first armed police patrol. In those days, police work covered a wide scope including fire services, immigration, transport, public hygiene, postal work, and even issuing of dog licenses.

Information about the Central Police Station Compound

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Named in memory of the first Chief Magistrate in Hong Kong, William Caine.

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29 Hollywood Road

In 1873, literati Wang Tao purchased printing equipment from London Missionary Society and established the Zhong Hua General Printing House. In 1874, he founded Tsun Wan Yat Po, the first news agency independently operated by Chinese and the forerunner of editorial in Hong Kong newspapers.

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In the early days Hong Kong, mountain chairs and sedan chairs were the major means of commutation to and from the Mid-levels. Now visitors may use the Central-Mid-levels escalators (opened in 1993) to tour the Mid-levels.

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20 Hollywood Road
“Grade 3 historic building”

The Land Registration Ordinance was enacted in 1844 in Hong Kong. No.20 Hollywood Road was one of the earliest land lots sold. The present building was built around 1920s – 30s, in “Art Deco” style (featuring streamlines and geometrical motifs) popular in those days.

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IN THE PAST

Spreading of western knowledge to the east

Heading west along the road, one reaches the source of thought enlightenment in the early days of Hong Kong.

TODAY

Antique shops, restaurants, bars and galleries

Intriguingly, Hollywood Road – once a centre of advanced thoughts and technologies – is now known for its antique shops and the antiquated aura.The churches and news agencies of the old days have for most part relocated, and are now replaced by “Soho” District of Hollywood Road – a mixture of exotic western restaurants, bars, and galleries which reflects the western lifestyle.

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At the junction of Hollywood Road, Aberdeen Street and Elgin Street

In the mid-19th century, the London Missionary Society played an instrumental role in popularising western knowledge and religious doctrines in Hong Kong. In 1844, the Society founded Ying Wa College and a printing house. In 1845, the Society built a church for its worshippers. In 1853, the Society founded the first Chinese newspaper in Hong Kong, The Chinese Serial. In 1888, the Society built the Daoji Mission House at 75 Hollywood Road for Chinese worshippers.

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Kung Lee Sugar Cane Juice
60 Hollywood Road

The building at No.60 was built in the 1920s. For over 60 years, the owner has been running an herbal tea shop selling herbal jelly and sugar cane juice. It used to be a popular hangout for youngsters in the 1950s. The owner grows sugar cane in his own fields in Ping Shan area of Yuen Long.

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Walking past the Central Police Station, you might have noticed that the lanes and alleys extending from Hollywood Road are all named after famous persons. They were either officials or socialites in Britain or in the colonial government.Walking through these alleys transports you into a 3-dimensional “who’s who” of historic personalities.

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62 Hollywood Road
“Grade 3 historic building”

The present building was built in the 1920s. A grocery was operated there until its closure in 2005.

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At the junction of Aberdeen Street, Hollywood Road and Shing Wong Street “Grade 3 historic building”

The original campus of the Central School was established at Gough Street, north of Hollywood Road. It was the first government school in Hong Kong providing western education to the public at the upper primary and secondary levels.

Dr. Sun Yat-sen studied at the school in 1884-1886. In 1889, the School was relocated to a site at the junction of Aberdeen Street and Hollywood Road, and the Gough Street campus was then converted to Belilios Public School.

In 1894, the Central School was renamed as Queen’s College, and the name stayed until today. The school buildings at Hollywood Road were severely damaged during WWII. In 1950, the College was rebuilt in Causeway Bay. The original site was rebuilt as the first Police Married Quarters for married junior police officers. It was left unused since 2000. In 2010, plans commenced to turn the site into a creativity centre.

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Dr. Sun Yat-sen
Dr. Sun Yat-sen Museum and Historial Trail Kom Tong Hall, 7 Castle Road “Declared Monument”

Walking uphill along Aberdeen Street, one would reach Dr. Sun Yat-sen Museum.

In the footsteps of Dr. Sun Yat-sen
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Electric lighting
Electric lighting

In 1889, Hong Kong Electric was founded. Electric lighting gradually took the place of gas lamps and lit up the streets of Hong Kong.

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77 - 81 Hollywood Road

Located at the junction of Hollywood Road and Aberdeen Street, the Alice Memorial Hospital was where Dr. Sun Yat-sen studied and lived when he was in Hong Kong. In 1887, Chinese merchant Ho Kai and London Missionary Society founded Alice Memorial Hospital. The first medical school for Chinese, the Hong Kong College of Medicine for Chinese, was also set up in the hospital. Dr. Sun Yat-sen studied medicine here and was one of the first graduates in 1892.In 1912, the Hong Kong College of Medicine was integrated into the Faculty of Medicine of The University of Hong Kong.

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Red-whiskered Bulbul
Red-whiskered Bulbul

One of the common birds seen in the bushes is the Red-whiskered Bulbul. The Bulbul is characterised by tall and straight black head feathers and distinctive red spots on the cheeks, and appear as if dressed for the occasion. Its calls are a unique “bul-bul, bul-bul!”.

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城皇街 Shing Wong Street
Shing Wong Temple

Records indicate that there used to be a Shing Wong Temple at Shing Wong Street, but only the name of the street remains. The god Shing Wong has been reverently relocated to Man Mo Temple by the community.

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The Preaching Hall of American Congregational Mission -  Bridges Street Market
2 Bridges Street, Sheung Wan
“Grade 3 historic building”

Dr. Sun Yat-sen received Baptism here in 1883. During 1884 to 1886 when Dr. Sun Yat-sen was studying at the Central School, he took residence here. Later, the Hall relocated and the building at the site was demolished.

In 1953, Bridges Street Market was built on part of the original site of the Hall. This is the first public market that the Government built in the urban area after WWII.

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124 - 130 Hollywood Road
“Declared Monument”

Hollywood Road was also known as “Man Mo Temple Street” (translation) because of the existence of Man Mo Temple. The neighbourhood was Tai Ping Shan district occupied by the Chinese community in the early days of Hong Kong. The large amount of infrastructural works for building the city attracted a large number of Chinese from the Mainland to gain their livelihood in Hong Kong. As most of them arrived alone, they relied on neighbours, fellow townsman and tradesman for assistance, and the gods for blessings. Man Mo Temple, the roof of which adorned with ceramic figurines on the theme of boisterous Chinese opera, became their spiritual support. In around 1847, Man Mo Temple was built with donations from Chinese merchants, and many historic relics inside the temple are inscribed with the trademark of the donors and year of donation.

Besides being used for worship and blessing, Man Mo Temple Compound also served a number of social functions. As social systems became more comprehensive, many of these functions were taken over by other social institutions. Today, Man Mo Temple Compound reverts to its simple status as a temple, and many tablets with wishes for examination success are hung next to the statue of Man Cheong. This is a reflection of the attachment to traditional values among the Hong Kong people, as well as a sign of the importance that they place on the values controlled and symbolised by the gods.

Information about Man Mo Temple
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c.1847 The temple was constructed with donations from Chinese merchants.

1862 The construction of Kung Sor (public hall), a place where community gatherings were held and disputes resolved, was completed.

1872 Tung Wah Hospital was opened. Renowned Chinese merchants and socialites of Hong Kong paid their homage at the Man Mo Temple before officiating at the opening ceremony of the Hospital. Later, the Directors of the Tung Wah Group of Hospitals conduct autumn worships at the Man Mo Temple every year.

1880 Tung Wah Hospital organised the Man Mo Temple Free School and used the revenue of Man Mo Temple to subsidise the school expenses.

1908 Man Mo Temple Ordinance was enacted by the Hong Kong Government and the temple was entrusted to Tung Wah Hospital.

1957 The system of Miu-chuk (the temple manager) was officially abolished.

1958 The Government stipulated that the revenue of Man Mo Temple, after deducting the basic expenses, should be used for the development of charity works of the Tung Wah Group of Hospitals.

1971 Princess Anne of United Kingdom visited Man Mo Temple.

1994 Virtue Court was added to the back of Kung Sor for people to worship their ancestors.

2010 Man Mo Temple, Lit Shing Kung and Kung Sor were declared as monuments, continue attracting many worshippers to come.

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122 Hollywood Road
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Records of god-worshipping festivals
at Man Mo Temple
Open Treasury of Kwun Yam

26th of the 1st month of the Lunar Calendar

Birthday of Man Cheong

3rd of the 2nd month of the Lunar Calendar

Birthday of Kwan Ping

13th of the 5th month of the Lunar Calendar

Birthday of Justice Pao

6th of the 6th month of the Lunar Calendar

Birthday of Kwan Tai

24th of the 6th month of the Lunar Calendar

Birthday of Wang Ling Guan

27th of the 6th month of the Lunar Calendar

Birthday of Shing Wong

24th of the 7th month of the Lunar Calendar

Birthday of General Chau Chong

23rd of the 10th month of the Lunar Calendar

Birthday of Cheung Sin

23rd of the 11th month of the Lunar Calendar

The gods are too many to be mentioned above, and believers worship at will. This list of god-worshipping festivals is not exhausive.

*With the exception of Open Treasury of Kwun Yam, Man Mo Temple does not hold official celebration activities for the above god-worshipping festivals. However, individual worshippers may come to the temple for worship during individual festivals.

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Sacred Palanquin
Sacred Palanquin

The Sacred Palanquin of the temple is used to house the god statues during the celebrative parades. The names and trademarks of the Chinese merchant donors were carved on the palanquin.

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Letter writers
Letter writers

In the early days of Hong Kong, literate population was small and many “ letter writers ” set up business around Hollywood Road. They drafted letters, invitations and official correspondences for illiterate Chinese workers, and even offered simple fortune-telling services.

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51 Bridges Street
“Grade 1 historic building”
Lu Xun

When walking from Man Mo Temple uphill along Ladder Street, a building constructed with red bricks is noted. This is the first clubhouse built by the Chinese YMCA of Hong Kong in town. The building was designed by American architects and was completed in 1918.It housed a dormitory, a library, a grand hall, the first indoor gymmasium in Hong Kong, and a swimming pool. The diversity of the facilities was a first for Hong Kong and it quickly became a hotspot for Chinese organisations to hold cultural activities.

In 1927, Lu Xun was invited to Hong Kong and conducted two lectures, entitled “Silent China” and “Fading old tunes” in the building. Both lectures were met with a full-house of over 500 of audience.

Chinese Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA) of Hong Kong (Central Block)

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When walking from Man Mo Temple uphill along Ladder Street, a building constructed with red bricks is noted. This is the first clubhouse built by the Chinese YMCA of Hong Kong in town. The building was designed by American architects and was completed in 1918.

It housed a dormitory, a library, a grand hall, the first indoor gymmasium in Hong Kong, and a swimming pool. The diversity of the facilities was a first for Hong Kong and it quickly became a hotspot for Chinese organisations to hold cultural activities.

In 1927, Lu Xun was invited to Hong Kong and conducted two lectures, entitled “Silent China” and “Fading old tunes” in the building. Both lectures were met with a full-house of over 500 of audience.

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2 Caine Lane “Declared Monument”

Walking further uphill along Ladder Street from YMCA, one reaches the Hong Kong Museum of Medical Sciences. The building is the former Bacteriological Institute established in 1906, and is a building designed for the first medical laboratory in Hong Kong. In 1996, it was converted into the Hong Kong Museum of Medical Sciences.

Website of Hong Kong Museum of Medical Sciences
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Tai Ping Shan Street

At the west of the YMCA building is the Blake Garden of Tai Ping Shan Street. The area was densely populated in 1894, when the plague was prevalent in Hong Kong. The poor hygiene conditions in the district added to the severity of the epidemic. The government bought all buildings in the district and levelled them to the ground, and at the same time adopted house cleaning measures. The “Sanitary Board” that was charged with public hygiene later became the Urban Council (the predecessor of the Leisure and Cultural Services Department and the Food and Environmental Hygiene Department). Intriguingly, the Chinese took up many of the key positions on the Sanitary Board, with many Chinese leaders on the Board successfully entering the Legislative Council. This is a clear indication of the importance of public hygiene to Hong Kong’s urban development.

What used to be a hotbed for plague is now Blake Garden. It was named after the then Governor of Hong Kong, Henry Arthur Blake.

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“The Commoner’s Nightclub”

Hollywood Road, Possession Street and Queen’s Road West used to be the British army stationed. The military presence warded off the criminals nearby, and the government imposed a curfew in the area, so the street became known as the Tai Ping Shan (meaning “hill of peace and safety”).

In 1890, the colonial government put the area on open tender and allowed the public to set up stalls on the hillside to sell clothes and grocery, or provide fortune-telling services. This marked the beginning of the “Sheung Wan Flea Market”. Later, similar markets appeared all around Hong Kong. In 1897, the government lifted the 40-year-long curfew, and the evening flea markets grew in popularity.

In 1972, the government took back the land for carrying out reclamations on Hong Kong Island, and converted the flea market into the Hollywood Road Market. In 1992, the site was converted to Hollywood Road Park to provide a leisure and recreational venue for the community.

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Ilex rotunda
Beside 190 Hollywood Road Ilex rotunda

The Ilex trees on Hollywood Road were of the species of Ilex rotunda. The species is characterised by leaves of the shape of inverted oval or broad oval, bearing flowers around April and fruits between August and December.

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Tung Wah Hospital, sitting at the end of Hollywood Road, was the first Chinese charitable organisation legally recognised by the colonial government. It has been providing social services for over a hundred years. In the early days of Hong Kong, the Chinese were distrusting toward western medicine, and the expensive consultation fees were beyond the means of impoverished families.

In 1870, with the Government providing land and part of the capital, Chinese merchants raised funds to open a hospital that offered only Chinese medical treatments and Chinese medicine for the Chinese community – the Tung Wah Hospital. The name “Tung Wah Hospital” means “Hospital of Chinese people from Guangdong province”. Meant as a replacement of Kwong Fook I Tsz, the hospital opened its doors to the ill and impoverished. Later, the Tung Wah Hospital building on Po Yan Street could not meet the space requirement of the hospital and the hospital was rebuilt in 1933.

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Ox carts
Ox carts

Before the 1930s, ox carts were commonly used to transport trash and drinking water. The Government even set up a cow shed in Sheung Wan. Ox carts were gradually replaced by motor vehicles in the 1930s.

Rickshaws
Rickshaws

Rickshaws were introduced to Hong Kong from Japan in 1873. In 1917, Hong Kong had a total of 1580 rickshaws. It was the major means of transportation for the Hong Kong public. But with the advent of motor vehicles, rickshaws gradually faded out and the Government ceased to issue new rickshaw licenses in 1968.

Trams
Trams

Trams commenced services in 1904. It was the most long-standing means of land transport since the early years of Hong Kong. It remains in service even today. A life-size tram model of the 1950s was on display in the Hong Kong Museum of History.

Kowloon-Canton Railway(KCR)

The KCR Terminus in Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon was opened in 1911. The KCR was the first railway that connected Hong Kong to the Mainland of China.

Cross-harbour Ferry
Cross-harbour Ferry

Cross-harbour Ferry commenced services in 1898. It is a long-standing means of transport connecting Kowloon and Hong Kong Island.

Buses

Buses appeared in the streets of Hong Kong in as early as the 1920s. In 1933, the Government issued formal licenses and the bus services on the Hong Kong Island were operated by the China Motor Bus Company Limited.

Buses
Taxis
Taxis

Taxis appeared on Hong Kong Island in the 1920s. Today, over 18,000 taxis serve the Hong Kong public.

Junks

Junks used to be both residence and means of livelihood for fishermen in Hong Kong. Now it has become the logo of the Hong Kong Tourism Board.

Junks
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Kwong Fook I Tsz
40 Tai Ping Shan Street
“Grade 2 historic building”

Also known as the “Pak Shing temple”, Kwong Fook I Tsz was built in the 1850s to enshrine the soul tablets of Chinese workers who had died far away from their hometown.

Later the government ordered the dissolution of the temple organisation, and its original functions of providing free medical services were taken up by the new Tung Wah Hospital. Now, the main hall of the temple consecrates the Ksitigarbha Bodhisattva and the Ji-gong Buddha; while the inner hall serves as an ancestral hall for the community.

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12 Po Yan Street. The main building of Tung Wah Hospital is a “Grade 1 historic building”.

Tung Wah Hospital commenced operation in 1872 as the first Chinese medicine hospital in Hong Kong. Because of the plague epidemic of the late 19th century, the hospital introduced western medical services since 1897. Later, Kwong Wah Hospital and Tung Wah Eastern Hospital were built, constituting the well-known “Tung Wah Group of Hospitals” of today.

Because most directors of Tung Wah Hospital were also directors of Man Mo Temple, in addition to providing medical services, the hospital also took responsibility for charity works, disaster relief, dispute resolution, and maintenance of social order. For example, during the severe drought in China in 1877, Tung Wah Hospital raised a total of HKD 665,000 of donations. The charitable act was recognized by the Qing imperial court and the then Emperor Guangxu conferred a tablet in praise. The tablet is now placed in Man Mo Temple.

Website of Tung Wah Group of Hospitals
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As reclamation works ensued, the coastline of Hong Kong Island shifted northwards, and Hollywood Road was gradually removed from the competitive centre of Hong Kong. Now again planted with Ilex trees, Hollywood Road is the habitat for many birds and the place where visitors revisit the old Hong Kong.

Trolley-pushing hawkers look for old electric appliances from households. Teachers take students on field excursions here, telling the younger generation tales of toil of the older generation.

The blue skies and bright sun reach into the azure windows newly installed at the Central Police Station, and add definition to the ornate roofs of Man Mo Temple.

They are all telling stories of Hong Kong.

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Central Police Station Compound Man Mo Temple Compound Story HOLLY WOOD ROAD荷李活道 HONG KONG HERITAGE SERIES   BUILT IN HONG KONG Conserve and Revitalise Hong Kong Heritage Antiquities and Monuments Office Hollywood Road Named after Sir Henry Pottinger, the first governor of Hong Kong.  Since the whole street was paved with slabs of stone, the local Chinese called it “Stone Slab Stree 砵典乍街 Pottinger Street 「一級歷史建築 」 亞畢諾道 Arbuthnot Road 贊善里 Chancery Lane Caine Road Named after Old Bailey, an old prison in Britain. 奧卑利街 Old Bailey Street The who’s who of historic personalities 城皇街 Shing Wong Street 些利街 Shelley Street 卑利街 Peel Street Built around the 1850s and named after British Prime Minister Sir Robert Peel. 伊利近街 Elgin Street Named after James Bruce, the Earl of Elgin and the British Envoy Extraordinary to China in 1857. Named after British Foreign Secretary Sir George Hamilton-Gordon, the 4th Earl of Aberdeen. 鴨巴甸街 aberdeen street 城皇街 Shing Wong Street 樓梯街 ladder street「一級歷史建築」 This used to be the place where residents of Tai Ping Shan District took drinking water. 水池巷 Tank Lane 東街 Tung Street 水巷 Water Lane 西街 Sat Street As its name suggests, there used to be a police station on the street. The street just outside the police station was named Station Street. The police station was demolished after the epidemic in 1894, and Station Street was renamed Po Yee Street. The name Upper Station Street has been retained until the present day. 差館上街 Upper Station Street “Pound Lane” got its name from “Pound”, an animal-containment facility with wooden barriers. Pound Lane used to be the place where the British army reared horses, cows and sheep. 磅巷 Pouind Lane 水坑口街  Possession Street The landing site of the British army on January 1841. 普仁街 Po Yan Street Ilex Mango tree Red-whiskered Bulbul Banyan Trees Bul-bul ! The lush Banyan Trees planted at the outer walls of the quarters carried cool breezes to Hollywood Road. Beside 190 Hollywood Road Ilex rotunda Gas lamps The news agency for Tsun Wan Yat Po (The Universal Circulating Herald) Sedan chair Spreading of western knowledge to the east London Missionary Society Dr. Sun Yat-sen Electric lighting Alice Memorial Hospital Free schooling at Man Mo Temple Sacred Palanquin Letter writers Chinese Cultural Activities Blake Garden “The Commoner’s Nightclub” The Charitable Deeds of Chinese Merchants Public Transport Kwong Fook I Tsz Beautiful Scenes of Hong Kong Brief History of the Central Police Station Compound Stories about the Police Force Policemen of different nationalities in 1867 Prisoner population and meal menu in 1876 Central Police Station Compound Former Central Magistracy Victoria Prison Central Police Station 20 Hollywood Road Kung Lee Sugar Cane Juice 62 Hollywood Road Ilex leaves are one of the ingredients for making herbal tea (the Trilex Tea). Former Central School - Former Police Married Quarters Former Police Married Quarters Original Site of the Central School The Preaching Hall of American Congregational Mission -  Bridges Street Market Man Mo Temple Compound Brief History of Man Mo temple Records of god-worshipping festivals at Man Mo Temple Chinese Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA) of Hong Kong (Central Block) Man Mo Temple Lit Shing Kung Kung Sor Virtue Court Hong Kong Museum of Medical Sciences Kwong Fook I Tsz Tung Wah Hospital Hollywood Road Ilex Gas lamps Brief History of the Central Police Station Compound Stories about the Police Force Policemen of different nationalities in 1867 Prisoner population and meal menu in 1876 Caine Road The news agency for Tsun Wan Yat Po (The Universal Circulating Herald) Sedan chair 20 Hollywood Road Spreading of western knowledge to the east London Missionary Society Kung Lee Sugar Cane Juice The who’s who of historic personalities 62 Hollywood Road Ilex leaves are one of the ingredients for making herbal tea (the Trilex Tea). Former Central School - Former Police Married Quarters Dr. Sun Yat-sen Electric lighting Alice Memorial Hospital Red-whiskered Bulbul Shing Wong Temple The Preaching Hall of American Congregational Mission -  Bridges Street Market Man Mo Temple Compound Brief History of Man Mo temple Free schooling at Man Mo Temple Records of god-worshipping festivals at Man Mo Temple Sacred Palanquin Letter writers Chinese Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA) of Hong Kong (Central Block) Chinese Cultural Activities Hong Kong Museum of Medical Sciences Blacke Garden “The Commoner’s Nightclub” Ilex rotunda The Charitable Deeds of Chinese Merchants Public Transport Kwong Fook I Tsz Tung Wah Hospital Beautiful Scenes of Hong Kong Bul-bul! Central Police Station Compound Former Central Magistracy Victoria Prison Central Police Station Former Police Married Quarters Original Site of the Central School Man Mo Temple Lit Shing Kung Kung Sor Virtue Court Ox carts Rickshaws Trams Kowloon-Canton Railway(KCR) Cross-harbour Ferry Buses Taxis Junks Beautiful Scenes of Hong Kong 132  Chinese policemen 337  Indian policemen 89  European policemen Policewomen
The first female member of the Police Force was Miss Kimmy Koh, who was employed in 1949 as woman sub-inspector. Two years later, the Police Force recruited another 9 policewomen.
Meal for Chinese prisoners: one bowl of rice, four preserved fishes, one bowl of tea Meal for foreign prisoners: one piece of bread, one piece of beef, one cup of coffee In 1876, the Prison held a total of 514 Chinese prisoners and 40 foreign prisoners No.20 Hollywood Road Ilex leaves are one of the ingredients for making herbal tea (the Trilex Tea). Mountain chair Sedan chair This used to be the first free school organised by Tung Wah Hospital Student of Qing Dynasty Modern students Now, the Tung Wah Group of Hospitals provides education services to the public throughout the territory of Hong Kong Chinese Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA) of Hong Kong (Central Block) Lu Xun Ox carts Rickshaws Trams Cross-harbour Ferry Buses Taxis Junks Red-whiskered Bulbul