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Brief History

The three buildings in the Central Government Offices (CGO) Complex are all post-war buildings built in three phases with the East Wing completed in 1954; the Main Wing and Legislative Council Chamber in 1956; and the West Wing in 1959. A new Annexe was added to Main Wing in 1989 after the relocation of the Legislative Council to its present location in 1985. The West Wing at the Lower Albert Road level underwent a major transformation in 1998.

06 01

Architectural Interest

The CGO buildings are low-rise structures, situated in a well-wooded setting. They display the characteristics of the functionalist style of architecture, prevalent during the early to mid-20th century. The exteriors of the buildings have been altered over the years with additional storeys and changed finishes. The Main Wing is the best piece of architecture with special attention given to detail, while West Wing has the least significance.

Government House and other historical buildings in the vicinity have enhanced the historical and cultural significance of the site.

06 02

Proposed Future Use

Upon relocation of the existing offices to the new Central Government Complex at Tamar by end-2011, the CGO buildings will become vacant. Based on a recently-completed heritage consultancy study, the Main Wing and East Wing will be preserved for appropriate adaptive re-use, which shall be compatible with the original design and respect its previous function as the seat of Government. A free-standing office building for the Department of Justice is a very suitable use. The West Wing, which is of low historical significance and architectural merit, will be demolished to make way for commercial development. Part of its present footprint will be redeveloped as a garden to preserve the existing greenery. Appropriate height restrictions and public access requirements will be imposed for any future development.

06 03

 

Heritage Study on Central Government Offices Complex

The Antiquities and Monuments Office (AMO) has commissioned Purcell Miller Tritton LLP, a British firm of conservation architects, to conduct a consultancy study 'Historical and Architectural Appraisal of the Central Government Offices'. The study, conducted by Mr Michael Morrison, was completed in September 2009.

Purcell Miller Tritton LLP is one of the leading firms of architects and historic building consultants in the United Kingdom. It has undertaken conservation work for famous historic sites including the British Museum and the University of Oxford and the practice is appointed Conservation Adviser to The Crown Estate. It has also been commissioned by the Hong Kong Jockey Club to undertake a research into the history of the Central Police Station (CPS) Compound and prepare a Conservation Management Plan.

Full English version of the 'Historical and Architectural Appraisal of the Central Government Offices' study report :

     
Cover (1.91M) (This link will open in a new window)pdf
Executive Summary (1.51MB) (This link will open in a new window)pdf
Chapter 1 – Introduction (1.08MB) (This link will open in a new window)pdf
Chapter 2 – Understanding (47.9MB) (This link will open in a new window)pdf
Chapter 3 – Significance of the Central Government Office (10.6MB) (This link will open in a new window)pdf
Chapter 4 – Issues and Vulnerabilities (1.55MB) (This link will open in a new window)pdf
Chapter 5 – Conclusions and Recommendations (1.75MB) (This link will open in a new window)pdf
Chapter 6 – Bibliography (812KB) (This link will open in a new window)pdf
Appendices (13.3MB) (This link will open in a new window)pdf

(This link will open in a new window)Chinese translation of Executive Summary and Conclusions and Recommendations Chapters pdf

(This link will open in a new window)CV of Mr Michael Morrison pdf

(This link will open in a new window)PowerPoint Presentation material on "Conserving Central" (Chinese version only) pdf

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