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In response to the Heritage Conservation Policy, we have implemented the following package of initiatives:

* (This link will open in a new window)Conducting heritage impact assessment for new capital works projects
* Implementing the Revitalising Historic Buildings Through Partnership Scheme for Government-owned historic buildings
* Providing economic incentives for preservation of privately-owned historic buildings
* Facilitating maintenance of privately-owned graded historic buildings
* (This link will open in a new window)Setting up a Commissioner for Heritage's Office
* (This link will open in a new window)Taking forward heritage conservation and revitalisation projects
* (This link will open in a new window)Setting up the Built Heritage Conservation Fund


Conducting heritage impact assessment for new capital works projects

To ensure a balance be struck between the requirements for development initiated by Government and heritage conservation, project proponents and relevant works departments for all new capital works projects are required to consider whether their projects will affect sites or buildings of historic or archaeological significance. If the answer is in the affirmative, then a Heritage Impact Assessment will be required. Mitigation measures should be devised and the public should be engaged.

Information on Heritage Impact Assessment



Implementing the Revitalising Historic Buildings Through Partnership Scheme for Government-owned historic buildings

To adopt creative approaches in preserving historic buildings and expanding their usage, with a view to transforming these buildings into unique cultural landmarks. The modus operandi of social enterprise under commercial management will be adopted to achieve a win-win situation. The Government provides financial support as appropriate to render the scheme practicably feasible.

Information on Revitalising Historic Buildings Through Partnership Scheme



Providing economic incentives for conservation of privately-owned historic buildings

To address the threats of demolition of historic buildings for redevelopment, the Government has come up with attractive and effective administrative means to prevent privately-owned historic buildings from being demolished. The Administration has been actively engaging relevant stakeholders in devising appropriate measures including land exchange and transfer of development rights to compensate these owners for their loss of development rights.

(This link will open in a new window)Information on Preservation of King Yin Lei



Facilitating maintenance of privately-owned graded historic buildings

Government carries out repair and restoration works for declared monuments, or items deemed by Government to be monuments under private ownership. Since 2008, Government has expanded the scheme to also assist owners of private graded historic buildings to carry out repairs and regular maintenance works

Applications are considered on a case-by-case basis, subject to the technical assessment of an inter-departmental vetting panel and availability of funding. Factors such as the historic value of the building concerned and urgency of works will be considered. As a condition for financial assistance, the owners are required to agree to certain conditions, e.g., to allow reasonable access of the buildings concerned to the public.

Information on Financial Assistance for Maintenance Scheme



Setting up a Commissioner for Heritage's Office

To deal with this extensive subject, to raise the Government profile and visibility on heritage conservation matters, and to provide the focal point for local and overseas networking, Development Bureau has created on 25 April 2008 the post of Commissioner for Heritage who is supported by a certain number of staff.

Information on Commissioner for Heritage's Office




Taking forward conservation and revitalisation projects

There is community-wide consensus that we should revitalize historic buildings. In 2009, the Government announced the “Conserving Central” initiative, which comprises eight innovative projects to preserve many of the important cultural, historical and architectural features in Central while adding new life and vibrancy to the area. Two of the innovative projects, i.e. the former Police Married Quarters on Hollywood Road and the Central Police Station Compound, are implemented by the Commisioner for Heritage’s Office.

Information on Heritage Conservation and Revitalisation Projects



Setting up the Built Heritage Conservation Fund

The 2016 Policy Address announced the setting up of the Built Heritage Conservation Fund with $500 million earmarked to implement the recommendations of the Antiquities Advisory Board pursuant to its policy review on the conservation of built heritage. The Built Heritage Conservation Fund was established in 2016 to provide subsidies for public education, community involvement and publicity activities, and academic research apart from covering certain existing government initiatives and activities on built heritage conservation including the Revitalising Historic Buildings Through Partnership Scheme and the Financial Assistance for Maintenance Scheme. In 2017, two new funding schemes for public engagement projects and thematic research were launched under the Fund.